LUG Community Blogs

Adam Trickett: Bog Roll: My Body Mass Index

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 20/04/2015 - 20:07

About a decade ago I decided to lose some weight. I've always been overweight for my height - or undertall for my weight. I managed to reduce my weight slowly over a number of months by removing snacks & junk, and basic portion control. Combined with more exercise I managed to shed a quite a few kilos.

My diet and exercise regime has largely remained constant, I don't each too much junk and have plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables in my diet and in summer bike quite a bit. However overtime more snacks sneaked in, and portions started to grow again. While I wasn't as heavy as I was a decade ago, I was definetly heavier than I should be.

While I'm still highly dubious of the Body Mass Index (BMI), it being based on flawed maths, I clearly need to target a much lower weight than the last time I reduce my mass. The BMI suggests about 75 kg for my height (1.7 m), and at the moment I'm 83.5 kg and falling by a target rate of about 100 g per day. If I stay on track that's about 26 weeks on my current diet before I tweak it to level off.

So far I've stuck a pretty even rate of about 111 g per day, and I've only had one period of food cravings, after a bike ride on an empty stomach - which was to be expected - and was satisfied with an some fruit and a drink of water.

I've also managed to drop a trouser size, going from 91.5 cm being tight, through being loose, to 86.5 cm being wearable if a little tight after a meal. According to the height to waist theory - which has better science behind it than the BMI - I should aim to wear 81.5 cm trousers and they should be loose.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: skx-www upgraded to jessie

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 18/04/2015 - 01:00

Today I upgraded my main web-host to the Jessie release of Debian GNU/Linux.

I performed the upgraded by changing wheezy to jessie in the sources.list file, then ran:

apt-get update apt-get dist-upgrade

For some reason this didn't upgrade my kernel, which remained the 3.2.x version. That failed to boot, due to some udev/systemd issues (lots of "waiting for job: udev /dev/vda", etc, etc). To fix this I logged into my KVM-host, chrooted into the disk image (which I mounted via the use of kpartx), and installed the 3.16.x kernel, before rebooting into that.

All my websites seemed to be OK, but I made some changes regardless. (This was mostly for "neatness", using Debian packages instead of gems, and installing the attic package rather than keeping the source-install I'd made to /opt/attic.)

The only surprise was the significant upgrade of the Net::DNS perl-module. Nothing that a few minutes work didn't fix.

Now that I've upgraded the SSL-issue I had with redirections is no longer present. So it was a worthwhile thing to do.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Oddfellows"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Fri, 17/04/2015 - 08:04
Event-Date: Wednesday, 15 April, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: http://www.oddfellowshallpub.co.uk Compton Wolverhampton West Midlands WV6 8AA Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Subject - Verb Agreement

Planet HantsLUG - Tue, 14/04/2015 - 01:00

There's pretty much no way that I can describe the act of cutting a live, 240V mains-voltage, wire in half with a pair of scissors which doesn't make me look like an idiot.

Yet yesterday evening that is exactly what I did.

There were mitigating circumstances, but trying to explain them would make little sense unless you could see the scene.

In conclusion: I'm alive, although I almost wasn't.

My scissors? They have a hole in them.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Philip Stubbs: DIY USB OTG Cable

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 11/04/2015 - 19:31
Suddenly decided that I needed a USB OTG cable. Rather than wait for one in the post, i decided to make one from spare cables found in my box of bits.Initially I thought that it would be a simple case of just cutting the cables and reconnecting a USB connector from a phone lead to a female USB socket. Unfortunately that is not the case.The USB cable has four wires, but the micro USB plug has five contacts. The unused contact needs to connected to ground to make the OTG cable. The plug on the cable I used does not have a connection for the  extra pin, so I needed to rip it apart and blob a lump of solder on two pins. The body of the plug has a wall between each pin, so I rammed a small screwdriver in there to allow the soldered pins to fit.




I then reassembled the plug, and continued with the connecting the wires together. This was an easy case of , red to red, black to black, green to green and white to white. A piece of heat shrink covers the mess.Now to use it. It allows me to plug a keyboard into my Nexus tablet. If I plug a mouse in, a pointer pops up. All of a sudden using the tablet feels like using a real computer. I am typing this with a keyboard on my lap down the garden with my tablet.The real motivation for the cable was to allow me to use my phone to adjust the settings on my MultiWii based control board of my Quadcopter. For that, it seems even better than MultiWiiConf, and certainly a lot more convenient when out flying.
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Kemp: Some things get moved, some things get doubled in size.

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 11/04/2015 - 01:00

Relocation

We're about three months away from relocating from Edinburgh to Newcastle and some of the immediate panic has worn off.

We've sold our sofa, our spare sofa, etc, etc. We've bought a used dining-table, chairs, and a small sofa, etc. We need to populate the second-bedroom as an actual bedroom, do some painting, & etc, but things are slowly getting done.

I've registered myself as a landlord with the city council, so that I can rent the flat out without getting into trouble, and I'm in the process of discussing the income possabilities with a couple of agencies.

We're still unsure of precisely which hospital, from the many choices, in Newcastle my wife will be stationed at. That's frustrating because she could be in the city proper, or outside it. So we need to know before we can find a place to rent there.

Anyway moving? It'll be annoying, but we're making progress. Plus, how hard can it be?

VLAN Expansion

I previously had a /28 assigned for my own use, now I've doubled that to a /27 which gives me the ability to create more virtual machines and run some SSL on some websites.

Using SNI I've actually got the ability to run SSL almost all sites. So I configured myself as a CA and generated a bunch of certificates for myself. (Annoyingly few tutorials on running a CA mentioned SNI so it took a few attempts to get the SAN working. But once I got the hang of it it was simple enough.)

So if you have my certificate authority file installed you can browse many, many of my interesting websites over SSL.

SSL

I run a number of servers behind a reverse-proxy. At the moment the back-end is lighttpd. Now that I have SSL setup the incoming requests hit the proxy, get routed to lighttpd and all is well. Mostly.

However redirections break. A request for:

  • https://lumail.org/docs

Gets rewritten to:

  • http://lumail.org/docs/

That is because lighttpd generates the redirection and it only sees the HTTP connection. It seems there is mod_extforward which should allow the server to be aware of the SSL - but it doesn't do so in a useful fashion.

So right now most of my sites are SSL-enabled, but sometimes they'll flip to naked and unprotected. Annoying.

I don't yet have a solution..

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Bring-A-Box, Saturday 11 April 2015, All Saints, Mitcham

Surrey LUG - Fri, 10/04/2015 - 22:26
Start: 2015-04-11 12:15 End: 2015-04-11 16:30

We have regular sessions on the second Saturday of each month. Bring a 'box', bring a notebook, bring anything that might run Linux, or just bring yourself and enjoy socialising/learning/teaching or simply chilling out!

This month's meeting is at the All Saints Centre, Mitcham, Surrey.  CR4 4JN

New members are very welcome. We're not a cliquey bunch, so you won't feel out of place! Usually between 15 and 30 people come along.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Steve Engledow (stilvoid): It turns

Planet ALUG - Sat, 04/04/2015 - 10:24

Over the past few months, I've mentioned to a few people that I like the idea of Firefox OS and that I've used the emulator and been fairly impressed. Well I've just put my money where my mouth is and ordered a Geeksphone revolution.

I'll admit that the decision to buy the phone wasn't purely to support Firefox OS; my hand was forced and I faced a dilemma:

After dropping my nexus 4 and cracking the screen (leaving the touchscreen only partially working), I found out that a repair with genuine parts would cost me nearly £100. My N4 being quite old now - and fairly crashy with lollipop - I couldn't quite justify the repair cost.

To be honest, I've been enjoying living without a usable phone except for the odd rare moments when I've needed to make a call while out. For that reason I decided that a brand new top of the range phone was out of the question.

I didn't want to go as far as getting a feature phone (I'm so used to having a smart phone now) and the Revolution seems like it offers a good compromise on cost vs. features.

So the intention is to live with Firefox OS but if it turns out to be ghastly, the phone will happily run AOSP and I can switch back and forth at will - yes, it even dual boots.

I'm sure I'll waffle on about my first impressions when it arrives...

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Andy Smith: Home file server / disk enclosure troubles

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 01/04/2015 - 20:47

On March 26th the file server here at home started resetting one of its ATA links over and over, in a couple of bursts each hour. Like this:

Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.573170] ata5.03: exception Emask 0x0 SAct 0xc0 SErr 0x400000 action 0x6 Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.579164] ata5.03: irq_stat 0x00060002, device error via SDB FIS Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.585127] ata5.03: SError: { Handshk } Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.591016] ata5.03: failed command: WRITE FPDMA QUEUED Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.596962] ata5.03: cmd 61/80:30:80:79:10/00:00:14:00:00/40 tag 6 ncq 65536 out Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.596962] res 41/84:00:9f:79:10/00:00:14:00:00/40 Emask 0x410 (ATA bus error) Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.609065] ata5.03: status: { DRDY ERR } Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.615131] ata5.03: error: { ICRC ABRT } Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.621135] ata5.03: failed command: WRITE FPDMA QUEUED Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.627123] ata5.03: cmd 61/80:38:00:7a:10/00:00:14:00:00/40 tag 7 ncq 65536 out Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.627123] res 98/d7:00:00:00:00/00:00:00:70:98/00 Emask 0x2 (HSM violation) Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.639241] ata5.03: status: { Busy } Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.645349] ata5.03: error: { ICRC UNC AMNF IDNF ABRT } Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.651591] ata5.03: hard resetting link Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.976944] ata5.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.984592] ata5.03: configured for UDMA/100 Mar 26 13:38:34 specialbrew kernel: [5137674.990852] ata5: EH complete

Or this:

Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.767785] ata5.02: exception Emask 0x0 SAct 0x100000 SErr 0x400000 action 0x6 Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.774595] ata5.02: irq_stat 0x00060002, device error via SDB FIS Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.781330] ata5.02: SError: { Handshk } Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.788067] ata5.02: failed command: WRITE FPDMA QUEUED Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.794853] ata5.02: cmd 61/80:a0:00:20:a8/00:00:25:00:00/40 tag 20 ncq 65536 out Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.794853] res 41/84:80:00:20:a8/00:00:25:00:00/00 Emask 0x410 (ATA bus error) Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.808592] ata5.02: status: { DRDY ERR } Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.815527] ata5.02: error: { ICRC ABRT } Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138576.822504] ata5.02: hard resetting link Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138577.145789] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138577.154616] ata5.02: configured for UDMA/100 Mar 26 13:53:36 specialbrew kernel: [5138577.161849] ata5: EH complete Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.402262] ata5.03: failed command: WRITE FPDMA QUEUED Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.409516] ata5.03: cmd 61/d8:f0:a0:5b:11/00:00:00:00:00/40 tag 30 ncq 110592 out Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.409516] res 99/d7:00:00:00:00/00:00:00:e0:99/00 Emask 0x2 (HSM violation) Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.424086] ata5.03: status: { Busy } Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.431389] ata5.03: error: { ICRC UNC AMNF IDNF ABRT } Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.438850] ata5.03: hard resetting link Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.765827] ata5.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.774446] ata5.03: configured for UDMA/100 Mar 26 13:53:38 specialbrew kernel: [5138578.781795] ata5: EH complete

Despite the masses of link resets a couple of times an hour it all seemed to be working still, and it was a few days before I looked into it further.

The hardware is an HP Microserver with a Sans Digital 8-bay SATA disk enclosure connected over 2x eSATA. The Microserver’s four internal SATA slots are used for something else; these messages relate to the two eSATA links (ata5 and ata6) to the disk enclosure. There’s seven disks in there, six of which form a btrfs filesystem which holds the majority of files we use here at home (yes, I’ve heard about ZFSonLinux. No, I’m not interested in using it yet).

I have never been too happy with that Sans Digital enclosure:

  • Half the LEDs on the front have never worked. So you only get link lights for one SATA link.
  • As a more general example of the above, the mechanical build quality just seems bad. It’s really flimsy.
  • It’s pretty slow to detect disks and spews errors in the dmesg as it does.
  • It’s done this thing before where it resets the SATA link over and over, but the problem mysteriously went away when everything was power-cycled.

So anyway, plan of action:

  1. Try rebooting everything.
  2. If no joy, buy a new enclosure from somewhere and try to make it not another one of those.

It was 30th March before I got around to giving that a go. There was a short period of terror where the Microserver abruptly declared

No boot device. Insert boot floppy.

but amusingly this turned out to be because the BIOS was set to prefer booting off a USB disk, and I had left my Sansa Clip plugged in to charge it. It was trying to boot off of an mp3 player.

Sadly once we did actually get past GruB things were not much happier. SATA links resetting pretty much continuously, to the point were it couldn’t even get to the end of Linux attaching the disks as SCSI devices. Unplugging the eSATA cables entirely left the Microserver happy to boot with no issues other than all my data being missing!

A process of elimination (take all disks out, boot, put disks back in one by one and boot each time until everything complains) allowed me to identify one particular disk that was really upsetting things. I was able to boot without that disk inserted, and I could mount the btrfs filesystem in degraded mode as it’s a RAID-1 for both data and metadata.

At this point I decided to push my luck and try inserting that one problematic disk again. As soon as I did it all went crazy again, and the link resets caused a bunch more devices to be ejected by Linux. I was left with a btrfs filesystem with three remaining devices that had mounted itself read-only due to read errors.

So, is it the disk or is the the enclosure?

I don’t have a spare enclosure so it’s rather difficult to stress test that, but bearing in mind that I’m not too happy with it anyway I decided to buy a new enclosure anyway and investigate the existing one later. This time I decided to try this thing, which appears to be a CFi-B7886CM. No I’ve never heard of them either but I doubt it is any different to what Sans Digital buy and slap their branding on.

It’s quite a bit cheaper than the Sans Digital unit, though obviously it only has one eSATA link. I’m not too bothered by that as I doubt that any four of my disks were exceeding 3Gbps or whatever, so yeah, whatever, I’ll put six disks on one link. It might even be a benefit if I want to add another one of these enclosures later, as there’s no more room in the Microserver for more eSATA cards.

While that was on order I got things back up and running with the five disks and had the btrfs filesystem running degraded (yes, I do have backups). I attached that suspect disk to another machine via a USB dock and was able to repeatedly read it all, perform SMART long tests on it without error, etc.

The disk caddies are almost identical, and are interchangeable.

The new enclosure arrived today and my first impressions of it are fairly positive. In terms of appearance and dimensions it’s almost identical to the Sans Digital one. In fact the disk caddies look identical bar the colour of the plastic handle, and are interchangeable, which saved me the hassle of having to unscrew 28 screws (seven disks, four per disk) and screw them in again. It definitely feels bit more sturdy though.

On boot for some reason I expected the btrfs filesystem to not automatically mount. It had been running with a device missing for nearly two days, and in that state you have to do

# mount -odegraded /srv/tank

to get it to mount, so I was thinking that even with all disks inserted it would decide that the out-of-date disk was unacceptable and require manual intervention to mount it. Well, I was wrong about that. It automatically mounted it and then immediately started complaining:

Apr 1 14:46:14 specialbrew kernel: [ 161.210994] BTRFS info (device sdj): csum failed ino 259 off 12288 csum 1424469249 expected csum 1836639932 Apr 1 14:46:14 specialbrew kernel: [ 161.211321] BTRFS info (device sdj): csum failed ino 259 off 24576 csum 3532125205 expected csum 1877817807 Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.447070] verify_parent_transid: 9 callbacks suppressed Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.457108] parent transid verify failed on 3438446813184 wanted 1144554 found 1141678 Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.468310] repair_io_failure: 16 callbacks suppressed Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.478409] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3438446813184 (dev /dev/sdk sector 1525564240) Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.491461] parent transid verify failed on 3438446821376 wanted 1144554 found 1141678 Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.501892] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3438446821376 (dev /dev/sdk sector 1525564256) Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.512262] parent transid verify failed on 3438336446464 wanted 1144475 found 1141571 Apr 1 14:46:19 specialbrew kernel: [ 165.522746] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3438336446464 (dev /dev/sdk sector 1525348680) Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.411201] parent transid verify failed on 3892014911488 wanted 1144992 found 1142134 Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.422607] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3892014911488 (dev /dev/sdk sector 150856) Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.442075] parent transid verify failed on 3892014706688 wanted 1144992 found 1142133 Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.453157] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3892014706688 (dev /dev/sdk sector 150456) Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.475472] parent transid verify failed on 3892014710784 wanted 1144992 found 1142133 Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.486688] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3892014710784 (dev /dev/sdk sector 150464) Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.508824] parent transid verify failed on 3892014714880 wanted 1144992 found 1142133 Apr 1 14:46:34 specialbrew kernel: [ 180.519368] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3892014714880 (dev /dev/sdk sector 150472) Apr 1 14:47:22 specialbrew kernel: [ 229.019490] parent transid verify failed on 3438634471424 wanted 1144757 found 1141901 Apr 1 14:47:22 specialbrew kernel: [ 229.056008] BTRFS: read error corrected: ino 1 off 3438634471424 (dev /dev/sdk sector 1525930760)

It’s nice to have all the blinkenlights blinking.

This is apparently what you would normally expect from btrfs fixing the out-of-date metadata from the other copy.

Everything seems okay; there are no read errors and no more link resets, and a cursory inspection of important data is matching up with checksums from last good backup. Oh, and all the SATA link/activity LEDs work!

I have to now:

  • do a btrfs scrub to make sure all the data on sdk is correct.
  • investigate the Sans Digital enclosure to see if I can replicate its brokenness.

While we’re at it, is there a brand of label tape that doesn’t dry up and peel off?

Electronically I can’t tell if it’s any different to the old enclosure (aside from only having one SATA link, not two).

Comparing the dmesg between “SCSI subsystem initialized” and the last SCSI disk being attached, for the old and the new enclosure I see a few interesting differences. The new one is a little bit faster, and has fewer weird errors (failed to IDENTIFY, etc.).

Old:

[ 5.818389] ata5.15: Port Multiplier 1.1, 0x1095:0x3726 r23, 6 ports, feat 0x1/0x9

New:

[ 8.116807] ata6.15: Port Multiplier 1.2, 0x197b:0x575f r0, 15 ports, feat 0x5/0xf

So the new one supports Port Multiplier v1.2 as opposed to v1.1. Presumably that is good news. I wonder what feat 0x1/0x9 vs feat 0x5/0xf means?

With the old enclosure the SATA links seem to come up as a mixture of 1.5 and 3.0Gbps, and multiple times as the links are reset:


[ 3.510120] ata2: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300)
[ 3.510209] ata3: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 3.510290] ata1: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300)
[ 3.510359] ata4: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300)
[ 5.818090] ata5: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 6.138331] ata5.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320)
[ 6.458331] ata5.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 6.778330] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 7.738323] ata5.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320)
[ 10.082066] ata5.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 10.402304] ata5.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320)
[ 11.778298] ata5.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 12.098296] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 13.058294] ata5.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320)
[ 15.406036] ata5.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 15.726279] ata5.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320)
[ 16.046275] ata5.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 17.418267] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 18.378264] ata5.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320)
[ 20.586006] ata6: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 20.906281] ata6.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320)
[ 21.226248] ata6.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 21.866245] ata6.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 22.506241] ata6.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320)
[ 24.869982] ata6.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 25.190226] ata6.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320)
[ 26.546216] ata6.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 27.186212] ata6.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 27.826212] ata6.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320)
[ 30.169952] ata6.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 30.490216] ata6.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320)
[ 31.866187] ata6.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 32.506184] ata6.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 33.146180] ata6.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320)

The new one, they’re all 6.0Gbps (although the eSATA link itself seems to only be 3Gbps; not sure why that would be but it’s no worse anyway):


[ 3.509782] ata1: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300)
[ 3.513788] ata2: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300)
[ 3.513878] ata4: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300)
[ 3.513965] ata3: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300)
[ 7.961748] ata6: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0)
[ 8.454063] ata6.00: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[ 8.822059] ata6.01: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[ 9.174057] ata6.02: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[ 9.510064] ata6.03: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[ 9.846061] ata6.04: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[ 10.182059] ata6.05: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)
[ 10.518057] ata6.06: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300)

Hmm, probably should investigate why /dev/sd[a-d] all have their write cache disabled.

Update 2nd April:

The scrub seems to have gone okay:

scrub status for 472ee2b3-4dc3-4fc1-80bc-5ba967069ceb scrub device /dev/sdh (id 2) history scrub started at Wed Apr 1 20:05:58 2015 and finished after 14642 seconds total bytes scrubbed: 383.42GiB with 0 errors scrub device /dev/sdg (id 3) history scrub started at Wed Apr 1 20:05:58 2015 and finished after 14504 seconds total bytes scrubbed: 382.62GiB with 0 errors scrub device /dev/sdf (id 4) history scrub started at Wed Apr 1 20:05:58 2015 and finished after 14436 seconds total bytes scrubbed: 383.00GiB with 0 errors scrub device /dev/sdk (id 5) history scrub started at Wed Apr 1 20:05:58 2015 and finished after 21156 seconds total bytes scrubbed: 1.13TiB with 14530 errors error details: verify=10909 csum=3621 corrected errors: 14530, uncorrectable errors: 0, unverified errors: 0 scrub device /dev/sdj (id 6) history scrub started at Wed Apr 1 20:05:58 2015 and finished after 5693 seconds total bytes scrubbed: 119.42GiB with 0 errors scrub device /dev/sde (id 7) history scrub started at Wed Apr 1 20:05:58 2015 and finished after 5282 seconds total bytes scrubbed: 114.45GiB with 0 errors

Those dmesg excerpts.

Old enclosure:

[ 3.010635] SCSI subsystem initialized [ 3.013325] libata version 3.00 loaded. [ 3.014937] ahci 0000:00:11.0: version 3.0 [ 3.015245] ahci 0000:00:11.0: irq 42 for MSI/MSI-X [ 3.015350] ahci 0000:00:11.0: AHCI 0001.0200 32 slots 4 ports 3 Gbps 0xf impl SATA mode [ 3.015413] ahci 0000:00:11.0: flags: 64bit ncq sntf ilck pm led clo pmp pio slum part [ 3.016613] scsi0 : ahci [ 3.017073] scsi1 : ahci [ 3.017527] scsi2 : ahci [ 3.017891] scsi3 : ahci [ 3.018071] ata1: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffd00 irq 42 [ 3.018123] ata2: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffd80 irq 42 [ 3.018174] ata3: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffe00 irq 42 [ 3.018224] ata4: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffe80 irq 42 [ 3.510120] ata2: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) [ 3.510209] ata3: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 3.510290] ata1: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) [ 3.510359] ata4: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) [ 3.511393] ata3.00: ATA-8: ST3320418AS, CC38, max UDMA/133 [ 3.511446] ata3.00: 625142448 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.512865] ata3.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.550857] ata2.00: ATA-7: ST3320620AS, 3.AAC, max UDMA/133 [ 3.550910] ata2.00: 625134827 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.552655] ata4.00: ATA-7: ST3320620AS, 3.AAC, max UDMA/133 [ 3.552708] ata4.00: 625134827 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.555002] ata1.00: ATA-7: ST3320620AS, 3.AAC, max UDMA/133 [ 3.555055] ata1.00: 625134827 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.609166] ata2.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.610965] ata4.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.613304] ata1.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.613707] scsi 0:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320620AS C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.614932] scsi 1:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320620AS C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.615974] scsi 2:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320418AS CC38 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.616662] scsi 3:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320620AS C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.619964] sata_sil24 0000:02:00.0: version 1.1 [ 3.620839] scsi4 : sata_sil24 [ 3.621229] scsi5 : sata_sil24 [ 3.621391] ata5: SATA max UDMA/100 host m128@0xfe8ffc00 port 0xfe8f8000 irq 16 [ 3.621446] ata6: SATA max UDMA/100 host m128@0xfe8ffc00 port 0xfe8fa000 irq 16 [ 3.914252] Switched to clocksource tsc [ 5.818090] ata5: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 5.818389] ata5.15: Port Multiplier 1.1, 0x1095:0x3726 r23, 6 ports, feat 0x1/0x9 [ 5.820283] ata5.00: hard resetting link [ 6.138331] ata5.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) [ 6.138411] ata5.01: hard resetting link [ 6.458331] ata5.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 6.458412] ata5.02: hard resetting link [ 6.778330] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 6.778409] ata5.03: hard resetting link [ 7.098325] ata5.03: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 7.098427] ata5.04: hard resetting link [ 7.418325] ata5.04: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 7.418427] ata5.05: hard resetting link [ 7.738323] ata5.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320) [ 7.739205] ata5.00: ATA-8: ST2000DL003-9VT166, CC3C, max UDMA/133 [ 7.739259] ata5.00: 3907029168 sectors, multi 16: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 7.740177] ata5.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 7.850059] ata5.01: failed to IDENTIFY (I/O error, err_mask=0x11) [ 7.850116] ata5.15: hard resetting link [ 7.850161] ata5: controller in dubious state, performing PORT_RST [ 10.082066] ata5.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 10.082368] ata5.00: hard resetting link [ 10.402304] ata5.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) [ 11.458039] ata5.01: hard resetting link [ 11.778298] ata5.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 11.778378] ata5.02: hard resetting link [ 12.098296] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 12.738033] ata5.05: hard resetting link [ 13.058294] ata5.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320) [ 13.060046] ata5.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 13.061547] ata5.01: ATA-8: ST500DM002-1BD142, KC45, max UDMA/133 [ 13.061600] ata5.01: 976773168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 13.063284] ata5.01: configured for UDMA/100 [ 13.174029] ata5.02: failed to IDENTIFY (I/O error, err_mask=0x11) [ 13.174086] ata5.15: hard resetting link [ 13.174131] ata5: controller in dubious state, performing PORT_RST [ 15.406036] ata5.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 15.406340] ata5.00: hard resetting link [ 15.726279] ata5.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) [ 15.726359] ata5.01: hard resetting link [ 16.046275] ata5.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 17.098013] ata5.02: hard resetting link [ 17.418267] ata5.02: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 17.418347] ata5.03: hard resetting link [ 17.738266] ata5.03: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 17.738371] ata5.04: hard resetting link [ 18.058262] ata5.04: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 18.058364] ata5.05: hard resetting link [ 18.378264] ata5.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320) [ 18.380014] ata5.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 18.383049] ata5.01: configured for UDMA/100 [ 18.383981] ata5.02: ATA-8: ST2000DL003-9VT166, CC3C, max UDMA/133 [ 18.384034] ata5.02: 3907029168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 18.385025] ata5.02: configured for UDMA/100 [ 18.385136] ata5: EH complete [ 18.385504] scsi 4:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DL003-9VT1 CC3C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 18.386442] scsi 4:1:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST500DM002-1BD14 KC45 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 18.387336] scsi 4:2:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DL003-9VT1 CC3C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 20.586006] ata6: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 20.586306] ata6.15: Port Multiplier 1.1, 0x1095:0x3726 r23, 6 ports, feat 0x1/0x9 [ 20.588209] ata6.00: hard resetting link [ 20.906281] ata6.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) [ 20.906362] ata6.01: hard resetting link [ 21.226248] ata6.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 21.226328] ata6.02: hard resetting link [ 21.546245] ata6.02: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 21.546348] ata6.03: hard resetting link [ 21.866245] ata6.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 21.866326] ata6.04: hard resetting link [ 22.186243] ata6.04: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 22.186345] ata6.05: hard resetting link [ 22.506241] ata6.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320) [ 22.507044] ata6.00: ATA-8: ST2000DM001-1CH164, CC26, max UDMA/133 [ 22.507097] ata6.00: 3907029168 sectors, multi 16: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 22.526916] ata6.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 22.637976] ata6.01: failed to IDENTIFY (I/O error, err_mask=0x11) [ 22.638033] ata6.15: hard resetting link [ 22.638077] ata6: controller in dubious state, performing PORT_RST [ 24.869982] ata6.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 24.870284] ata6.00: hard resetting link [ 25.190226] ata6.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) [ 26.225956] ata6.01: hard resetting link [ 26.546216] ata6.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 26.865951] ata6.03: hard resetting link [ 27.186212] ata6.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 27.505948] ata6.05: hard resetting link [ 27.826212] ata6.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320) [ 27.828088] ata6.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 27.937960] ata6.01: failed to IDENTIFY (I/O error, err_mask=0x11) [ 27.938018] ata6.15: hard resetting link [ 27.938064] ata6: controller in dubious state, performing PORT_RST [ 30.169952] ata6.15: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 30.170255] ata6.00: hard resetting link [ 30.490216] ata6.00: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 320) [ 31.545926] ata6.01: hard resetting link [ 31.866187] ata6.01: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 31.866267] ata6.02: hard resetting link [ 32.186183] ata6.02: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 32.186286] ata6.03: hard resetting link [ 32.506184] ata6.03: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 32.506265] ata6.04: hard resetting link [ 32.826180] ata6.04: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 32.826283] ata6.05: hard resetting link [ 33.146180] ata6.05: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 320) [ 33.148097] ata6.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 33.149175] ata6.01: ATA-8: ST2000DM001-1CH164, CC26, max UDMA/133 [ 33.149232] ata6.01: 3907029168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 33.150077] ata6.01: configured for UDMA/100 [ 33.150673] ata6.03: ATA-9: WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0, 80.00A80, max UDMA/133 [ 33.151349] ata6.03: 5860533168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 33.151980] ata6.03: configured for UDMA/100 [ 33.152091] ata6: EH complete [ 33.152449] scsi 5:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DM001-1CH1 CC26 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 33.153351] scsi 5:1:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DM001-1CH1 CC26 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 33.154294] scsi 5:3:0:0: Direct-Access ATA WDC WD30EZRX-00D 0A80 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 33.159340] udevd[79]: starting version 175 [ 33.279358] pps_core: LinuxPPS API ver. 1 registered [ 33.279447] pps_core: Software ver. 5.3.6 - Copyright 2005-2007 Rodolfo Giometti [ 33.281013] PTP clock support registered [ 33.288070] tg3.c:v3.137 (May 11, 2014) [ 33.305489] ACPI: bus type USB registered [ 33.305628] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs [ 33.305692] usbcore: registered new interface driver hub [ 33.334492] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] 625142448 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 33.334600] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] 625134827 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 33.334663] sd 4:0:0:0: [sde] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 33.334713] sd 4:0:0:0: [sde] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 33.334769] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] 625134827 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 33.334851] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 625134827 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 33.335019] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off [ 33.335071] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.335654] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write Protect is off [ 33.335738] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.335805] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write Protect is off [ 33.335851] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.335931] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Write Protect is off [ 33.335981] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.335997] sd 4:0:0:0: [sde] Write Protect is off [ 33.336043] sd 4:0:0:0: [sde] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.336072] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.336272] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.336430] sd 4:0:0:0: [sde] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.336549] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.336657] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.338151] usbcore: registered new device driver usb [ 33.338392] sd 4:1:0:0: [sdf] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB) [ 33.338448] sd 4:1:0:0: [sdf] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 33.338556] sd 4:1:0:0: [sdf] Write Protect is off [ 33.338602] sd 4:1:0:0: [sdf] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.338631] sd 4:1:0:0: [sdf] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.340427] ehci_hcd: USB 2.0 'Enhanced' Host Controller (EHCI) Driver [ 33.340790] ehci-pci: EHCI PCI platform driver [ 33.341526] ohci_hcd: USB 1.1 'Open' Host Controller (OHCI) Driver [ 33.341963] ohci-pci: OHCI PCI platform driver [ 33.343818] sdf: unknown partition table [ 33.344181] sd 4:1:0:0: [sdf] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.344271] sd 4:2:0:0: [sdg] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 33.344322] sd 4:2:0:0: [sdg] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 33.344424] sd 4:2:0:0: [sdg] Write Protect is off [ 33.344470] sd 4:2:0:0: [sdg] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.344497] sd 4:2:0:0: [sdg] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.348760] sdc: sdc1 sdc2 sdc3 [ 33.348907] scsi6 : pata_atiixp [ 33.349487] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.349615] sd 5:0:0:0: [sdh] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 33.349674] sd 5:0:0:0: [sdh] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 33.349777] sd 5:0:0:0: [sdh] Write Protect is off [ 33.349892] sd 5:0:0:0: [sdh] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.349928] sd 5:0:0:0: [sdh] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.351467] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdi] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 33.351562] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdi] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 33.351659] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdi] Write Protect is off [ 33.351707] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdi] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.351731] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdi] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.354852] sdb: sdb1 sdb2 sdb3 [ 33.355394] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.355517] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdj] 5860533168 512-byte logical blocks: (3.00 TB/2.72 TiB) [ 33.355570] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdj] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 33.355687] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdj] Write Protect is off [ 33.355746] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdj] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 33.355774] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdj] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 33.356077] sdd: sdd1 sdd2 sdd3 [ 33.356565] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.356772] sde: unknown partition table [ 33.357024] sd 4:0:0:0: [sde] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.358014] sda: sda1 sda2 sda3 [ 33.358470] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.360879] sd 0:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg0 type 0 [ 33.361384] sd 1:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg1 type 0 [ 33.361524] sd 2:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0 [ 33.362055] sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0 [ 33.362192] random: nonblocking pool is initialized [ 33.362992] sdg: unknown partition table [ 33.363064] sd 4:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg4 type 0 [ 33.363217] sd 4:1:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg5 type 0 [ 33.363425] sd 4:2:0:0: [sdg] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.363684] sd 4:2:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg6 type 0 [ 33.364163] sd 5:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg7 type 0 [ 33.364262] scsi7 : pata_atiixp [ 33.364414] ata7: PATA max UDMA/100 cmd 0x1f0 ctl 0x3f6 bmdma 0xff00 irq 14 [ 33.364482] ata8: PATA max UDMA/100 cmd 0x170 ctl 0x376 bmdma 0xff08 irq 15 [ 33.364779] sd 5:1:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg8 type 0 [ 33.364816] QUIRK: Enable AMD PLL fix [ 33.364856] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: EHCI Host Controller [ 33.364916] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1 [ 33.364973] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: applying AMD SB700/SB800/Hudson-2/3 EHCI dummy qh workaround [ 33.365035] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: debug port 1 [ 33.365143] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: irq 17, io mem 0xfe5ff800 [ 33.365218] sd 5:3:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg9 type 0 [ 33.372701] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: Tigon3 [partno(BCM95723) rev 5784100] (PCI Express) MAC address d4:85:64:c9:e6:24 [ 33.372767] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: attached PHY is 5784 (10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet) (WireSpeed[1], EEE[0]) [ 33.372820] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: RXcsums[1] LinkChgREG[0] MIirq[0] ASF[0] TSOcap[1] [ 33.372870] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: dma_rwctrl[76180000] dma_mask[64-bit] [ 33.373201] sdh: unknown partition table [ 33.373555] sd 5:0:0:0: [sdh] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.373944] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00 [ 33.374071] usb usb1: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002 [ 33.374119] usb usb1: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 33.374169] usb usb1: Product: EHCI Host Controller [ 33.374214] usb usb1: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ehci_hcd [ 33.374260] usb usb1: SerialNumber: 0000:00:12.2 [ 33.374691] hub 1-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 33.374781] hub 1-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 33.375334] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: EHCI Host Controller [ 33.375390] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 2 [ 33.375449] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: applying AMD SB700/SB800/Hudson-2/3 EHCI dummy qh workaround [ 33.375512] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: debug port 1 [ 33.375607] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: irq 17, io mem 0xfe5ff400 [ 33.376656] sdi: unknown partition table [ 33.377076] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdi] Attached SCSI disk [ 33.385906] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00 [ 33.386167] usb usb2: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002 [ 33.386220] usb usb2: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 33.386270] usb usb2: Product: EHCI Host Controller [ 33.386316] usb usb2: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ehci_hcd [ 33.386362] usb usb2: SerialNumber: 0000:00:13.2 [ 33.387005] hub 2-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 33.387265] hub 2-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 33.387879] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: EHCI Host Controller [ 33.387933] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 3 [ 33.387986] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: applying AMD SB700/SB800/Hudson-2/3 EHCI dummy qh workaround [ 33.388049] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: debug port 1 [ 33.388139] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: irq 17, io mem 0xfe5ff000 [ 33.397878] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00 [ 33.398037] usb usb3: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002 [ 33.398090] usb usb3: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 33.398142] usb usb3: Product: EHCI Host Controller [ 33.398188] usb usb3: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ehci_hcd [ 33.398234] usb usb3: SerialNumber: 0000:00:16.2 [ 33.398551] hub 3-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 33.398615] hub 3-0:1.0: 4 ports detected [ 33.399512] ohci-pci 0000:00:12.0: OHCI PCI host controller [ 33.399567] ohci-pci 0000:00:12.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 4 [ 33.399666] ohci-pci 0000:00:12.0: irq 18, io mem 0xfe5fe000 [ 33.458012] usb usb4: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0001 [ 33.458069] usb usb4: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 33.458122] usb usb4: Product: OHCI PCI host controller [ 33.458167] usb usb4: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ohci_hcd [ 33.458214] usb usb4: SerialNumber: 0000:00:12.0 [ 33.458798] hub 4-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 33.458864] hub 4-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 33.459403] ohci-pci 0000:00:13.0: OHCI PCI host controller [ 33.460079] ohci-pci 0000:00:13.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 5 [ 33.460173] ohci-pci 0000:00:13.0: irq 18, io mem 0xfe5fd000 [ 33.517983] usb usb5: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0001 [ 33.518039] usb usb5: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 33.518093] usb usb5: Product: OHCI PCI host controller [ 33.518142] usb usb5: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ohci_hcd [ 33.518212] usb usb5: SerialNumber: 0000:00:13.0 [ 33.519228] hub 5-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 33.519291] hub 5-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 33.519871] ohci-pci 0000:00:16.0: OHCI PCI host controller [ 33.519946] ohci-pci 0000:00:16.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 6 [ 33.520048] ohci-pci 0000:00:16.0: irq 18, io mem 0xfe5fc000 [ 33.577996] usb usb6: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0001 [ 33.578054] usb usb6: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 33.578105] usb usb6: Product: OHCI PCI host controller [ 33.578151] usb usb6: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ohci_hcd [ 33.578198] usb usb6: SerialNumber: 0000:00:16.0 [ 33.578570] hub 6-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 33.578635] hub 6-0:1.0: 4 ports detected [ 34.261707] sdj: unknown partition table [ 34.262244] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdj] Attached SCSI disk

And with the new enclosure:

[ 3.014000] SCSI subsystem initialized [ 3.016739] libata version 3.00 loaded. [ 3.018309] ahci 0000:00:11.0: version 3.0 [ 3.018588] ahci 0000:00:11.0: irq 42 for MSI/MSI-X [ 3.018684] ahci 0000:00:11.0: AHCI 0001.0200 32 slots 4 ports 3 Gbps 0xf impl SATA mode [ 3.018742] ahci 0000:00:11.0: flags: 64bit ncq sntf ilck pm led clo pmp pio slum part [ 3.019841] scsi0 : ahci [ 3.020241] scsi1 : ahci [ 3.020705] scsi2 : ahci [ 3.021119] scsi3 : ahci [ 3.021317] ata1: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffd00 irq 42 [ 3.021372] ata2: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffd80 irq 42 [ 3.021427] ata3: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffe00 irq 42 [ 3.021479] ata4: SATA max UDMA/133 abar m1024@0xfe5ffc00 port 0xfe5ffe80 irq 42 [ 3.509782] ata1: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) [ 3.513788] ata2: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) [ 3.513878] ata4: SATA link up 1.5 Gbps (SStatus 113 SControl 300) [ 3.513965] ata3: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 300) [ 3.515180] ata3.00: ATA-8: ST3320418AS, CC38, max UDMA/133 [ 3.515233] ata3.00: 625142448 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.516651] ata3.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.554413] ata1.00: ATA-7: ST3320620AS, 3.AAC, max UDMA/133 [ 3.554466] ata1.00: 625134827 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.554593] ata2.00: ATA-7: ST3320620AS, 3.AAC, max UDMA/133 [ 3.554639] ata2.00: 625134827 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.557219] ata4.00: ATA-7: ST3320620AS, 3.AAC, max UDMA/133 [ 3.557272] ata4.00: 625134827 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 3.612719] ata1.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.612949] ata2.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.613000] scsi 0:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320620AS C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.613707] scsi 1:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320620AS C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.614554] scsi 2:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320418AS CC38 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.615496] ata4.00: configured for UDMA/133 [ 3.615739] scsi 3:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST3320620AS C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 3.619004] sata_sil24 0000:02:00.0: version 1.1 [ 3.619834] scsi4 : sata_sil24 [ 3.620237] scsi5 : sata_sil24 [ 3.620414] ata5: SATA max UDMA/100 host m128@0xfe8ffc00 port 0xfe8f8000 irq 16 [ 3.620468] ata6: SATA max UDMA/100 host m128@0xfe8ffc00 port 0xfe8fa000 irq 16 [ 3.921925] Switched to clocksource tsc [ 5.697760] ata5: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 0) [ 7.961748] ata6: SATA link up 3.0 Gbps (SStatus 123 SControl 0) [ 8.116807] ata6.15: Port Multiplier 1.2, 0x197b:0x575f r0, 15 ports, feat 0x5/0xf [ 8.119113] ata6.00: hard resetting link [ 8.454063] ata6.00: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 8.454167] ata6.01: hard resetting link [ 8.822059] ata6.01: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 8.822162] ata6.02: hard resetting link [ 9.174057] ata6.02: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 9.174160] ata6.03: hard resetting link [ 9.510064] ata6.03: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 9.510168] ata6.04: hard resetting link [ 9.846061] ata6.04: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 9.846165] ata6.05: hard resetting link [ 10.182059] ata6.05: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 10.182164] ata6.06: hard resetting link [ 10.518057] ata6.06: SATA link up 6.0 Gbps (SStatus 133 SControl 300) [ 10.518162] ata6.07: hard resetting link [ 10.838099] ata6.07: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 10.838219] ata6.08: hard resetting link [ 11.158095] ata6.08: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 11.158213] ata6.09: hard resetting link [ 11.478093] ata6.09: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 11.478212] ata6.10: hard resetting link [ 11.798094] ata6.10: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 11.798214] ata6.11: hard resetting link [ 12.118088] ata6.11: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 12.118208] ata6.12: hard resetting link [ 12.438091] ata6.12: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 12.438209] ata6.13: hard resetting link [ 12.758087] ata6.13: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 12.758206] ata6.14: hard resetting link [ 13.078082] ata6.14: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 320) [ 13.078746] ata6.00: ATA-9: WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0, 80.00A80, max UDMA/133 [ 13.078802] ata6.00: 5860533168 sectors, multi 16: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 13.079454] ata6.00: configured for UDMA/100 [ 13.083304] ata6.01: ATA-8: ST2000DM001-1CH164, CC26, max UDMA/133 [ 13.083357] ata6.01: 3907029168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 17.852068] ata6.01: configured for UDMA/100 [ 17.855904] ata6.02: ATA-8: ST2000DM001-1CH164, CC26, max UDMA/133 [ 17.855957] ata6.02: 3907029168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 22.590353] ata6.02: configured for UDMA/100 [ 22.596782] ata6.03: ATA-8: ST2000DL003-9VT166, CC3C, max UDMA/133 [ 22.596838] ata6.03: 3907029168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 22.614183] ata6.03: configured for UDMA/100 [ 22.616206] ata6.04: ATA-8: ST500DM002-1BD142, KC45, max UDMA/133 [ 22.616259] ata6.04: 976773168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 22.640259] ata6.04: configured for UDMA/100 [ 22.646640] ata6.05: ATA-8: ST2000DL003-9VT166, CC3C, max UDMA/133 [ 22.646693] ata6.05: 3907029168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 22.664004] ata6.05: configured for UDMA/100 [ 22.664550] ata6.06: ATA-9: WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0, 80.00A80, max UDMA/133 [ 22.664603] ata6.06: 5860533168 sectors, multi 0: LBA48 NCQ (depth 31/32) [ 22.665186] ata6.06: configured for UDMA/100 [ 22.665437] ata6: EH complete [ 22.665865] scsi 5:0:0:0: Direct-Access ATA WDC WD30EZRX-00D 0A80 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.666964] scsi 5:1:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DM001-1CH1 CC26 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.668009] scsi 5:2:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DM001-1CH1 CC26 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.668589] scsi 5:3:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DL003-9VT1 CC3C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.669046] scsi 5:4:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST500DM002-1BD14 KC45 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.669519] scsi 5:5:0:0: Direct-Access ATA ST2000DL003-9VT1 CC3C PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.669972] scsi 5:6:0:0: Direct-Access ATA WDC WD30EZRX-00D 0A80 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5 [ 22.674753] udevd[79]: starting version 175 [ 22.718011] pps_core: LinuxPPS API ver. 1 registered [ 22.718099] pps_core: Software ver. 5.3.6 - Copyright 2005-2007 Rodolfo Giometti [ 22.718474] PTP clock support registered [ 22.723563] tg3.c:v3.137 (May 11, 2014) [ 22.779806] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: Tigon3 [partno(BCM95723) rev 5784100] (PCI Express) MAC address d4:85:64:c9:e6:24 [ 22.779903] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: attached PHY is 5784 (10/100/1000Base-T Ethernet) (WireSpeed[1], EEE[0]) [ 22.779956] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: RXcsums[1] LinkChgREG[0] MIirq[0] ASF[0] TSOcap[1] [ 22.780009] tg3 0000:03:00.0 eth0: dma_rwctrl[76180000] dma_mask[64-bit] [ 22.781303] ACPI: bus type USB registered [ 22.781448] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbfs [ 22.781515] usbcore: registered new interface driver hub [ 22.808386] usbcore: registered new device driver usb [ 22.809764] ehci_hcd: USB 2.0 'Enhanced' Host Controller (EHCI) Driver [ 22.810453] ohci_hcd: USB 1.1 'Open' Host Controller (OHCI) Driver [ 22.810686] ehci-pci: EHCI PCI platform driver [ 22.810872] ohci-pci: OHCI PCI platform driver [ 22.823167] scsi6 : pata_atiixp [ 22.832627] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] 625134827 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 22.832785] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off [ 22.832834] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.832863] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.833349] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] 625142448 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 22.833402] sd 5:0:0:0: [sde] 5860533168 512-byte logical blocks: (3.00 TB/2.72 TiB) [ 22.833404] sd 5:0:0:0: [sde] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.833417] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] 625134827 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 22.833504] sd 5:0:0:0: [sde] Write Protect is off [ 22.833507] sd 5:0:0:0: [sde] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.833517] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write Protect is off [ 22.833520] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.833564] sd 5:0:0:0: [sde] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.833642] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.833777] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] 625134827 512-byte logical blocks: (320 GB/298 GiB) [ 22.834163] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write Protect is off [ 22.834212] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.834241] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.835054] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Write Protect is off [ 22.835101] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.835130] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Write cache: disabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.845520] sdc: sdc1 sdc2 sdc3 [ 22.846184] sd 2:0:0:0: [sdc] Attached SCSI disk [ 22.846305] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdf] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 22.846356] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdf] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.846455] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdf] Write Protect is off [ 22.846501] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdf] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.846528] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdf] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.850755] sd 5:2:0:0: [sdg] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 22.850849] sd 5:2:0:0: [sdg] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.850953] sd 5:2:0:0: [sdg] Write Protect is off [ 22.850999] sd 5:2:0:0: [sdg] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.851026] sd 5:2:0:0: [sdg] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.853444] sda: sda1 sda2 sda3 [ 22.854098] sdb: sdb1 sdb2 sdb3 [ 22.854559] sd 1:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI disk [ 22.854682] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdh] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 22.854738] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdh] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.854832] sd 0:0:0:0: [sda] Attached SCSI disk [ 22.854955] sd 5:4:0:0: [sdi] 976773168 512-byte logical blocks: (500 GB/465 GiB) [ 22.855008] sd 5:4:0:0: [sdi] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.855069] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdh] Write Protect is off [ 22.855118] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdh] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.855174] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdh] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.855303] sdf: unknown partition table [ 22.855502] sd 5:4:0:0: [sdi] Write Protect is off [ 22.855554] sd 5:4:0:0: [sdi] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.855666] sd 5:4:0:0: [sdi] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.855884] sd 5:1:0:0: [sdf] Attached SCSI disk [ 22.856103] sd 5:5:0:0: [sdj] 3907029168 512-byte logical blocks: (2.00 TB/1.81 TiB) [ 22.856154] sd 5:5:0:0: [sdj] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.856354] sdd: sdd1 sdd2 sdd3 [ 22.856791] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Attached SCSI disk [ 22.856903] sd 5:6:0:0: [sdk] 5860533168 512-byte logical blocks: (3.00 TB/2.72 TiB) [ 22.856954] sd 5:6:0:0: [sdk] 4096-byte physical blocks [ 22.857051] sd 5:6:0:0: [sdk] Write Protect is off [ 22.857097] sd 5:6:0:0: [sdk] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.857123] sd 5:6:0:0: [sdk] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.857453] sd 5:5:0:0: [sdj] Write Protect is off [ 22.857504] sd 5:5:0:0: [sdj] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00 [ 22.857542] sd 5:5:0:0: [sdj] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA [ 22.861699] sd 0:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg0 type 0 [ 22.864256] scsi7 : pata_atiixp [ 22.864427] ata7: PATA max UDMA/100 cmd 0x1f0 ctl 0x3f6 bmdma 0xff00 irq 14 [ 22.864479] ata8: PATA max UDMA/100 cmd 0x170 ctl 0x376 bmdma 0xff08 irq 15 [ 22.864823] QUIRK: Enable AMD PLL fix [ 22.864866] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: EHCI Host Controller [ 22.864921] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1 [ 22.864979] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: applying AMD SB700/SB800/Hudson-2/3 EHCI dummy qh workaround [ 22.865041] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: debug port 1 [ 22.865148] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: irq 17, io mem 0xfe5ff800 [ 22.865331] sdg: unknown partition table [ 22.865675] sd 5:2:0:0: [sdg] Attached SCSI disk [ 22.868644] sd 1:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg1 type 0 [ 22.869290] sd 2:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg2 type 0 [ 22.869628] sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0 [ 22.871473] sd 5:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg4 type 0 [ 22.872143] sd 5:1:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg5 type 0 [ 22.872544] sd 5:2:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg6 type 0 [ 22.872889] sd 5:3:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg7 type 0 [ 22.873228] sd 5:4:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg8 type 0 [ 22.873605] ehci-pci 0000:00:12.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00 [ 22.873738] usb usb1: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002 [ 22.873786] usb usb1: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 22.873836] usb usb1: Product: EHCI Host Controller [ 22.873881] usb usb1: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ehci_hcd [ 22.873927] usb usb1: SerialNumber: 0000:00:12.2 [ 22.874176] hub 1-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 22.874237] hub 1-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 22.874799] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: EHCI Host Controller [ 22.874853] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 2 [ 22.874908] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: applying AMD SB700/SB800/Hudson-2/3 EHCI dummy qh workaround [ 22.874970] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: debug port 1 [ 22.875060] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: irq 17, io mem 0xfe5ff400 [ 22.875304] sd 5:5:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg9 type 0 [ 22.875734] sd 5:6:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg10 type 0 [ 22.885688] ehci-pci 0000:00:13.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00 [ 22.885832] usb usb2: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002 [ 22.885885] usb usb2: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 22.885935] usb usb2: Product: EHCI Host Controller [ 22.885981] usb usb2: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ehci_hcd [ 22.886028] usb usb2: SerialNumber: 0000:00:13.2 [ 22.886291] hub 2-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 22.886350] hub 2-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 22.886918] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: EHCI Host Controller [ 22.886972] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 3 [ 22.887028] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: applying AMD SB700/SB800/Hudson-2/3 EHCI dummy qh workaround [ 22.887090] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: debug port 1 [ 22.887185] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: irq 17, io mem 0xfe5ff000 [ 22.897569] ehci-pci 0000:00:16.2: USB 2.0 started, EHCI 1.00 [ 22.897730] usb usb3: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0002 [ 22.897783] usb usb3: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 22.897836] usb usb3: Product: EHCI Host Controller [ 22.897883] usb usb3: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ehci_hcd [ 22.897932] usb usb3: SerialNumber: 0000:00:16.2 [ 22.898214] hub 3-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 22.898272] hub 3-0:1.0: 4 ports detected [ 22.898847] ohci-pci 0000:00:12.0: OHCI PCI host controller [ 22.898914] ohci-pci 0000:00:12.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 4 [ 22.899017] ohci-pci 0000:00:12.0: irq 18, io mem 0xfe5fe000 [ 22.957744] usb usb4: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0001 [ 22.957823] usb usb4: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 22.957874] usb usb4: Product: OHCI PCI host controller [ 22.957920] usb usb4: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ohci_hcd [ 22.957966] usb usb4: SerialNumber: 0000:00:12.0 [ 22.958434] hub 4-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 22.958495] hub 4-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 22.959085] ohci-pci 0000:00:13.0: OHCI PCI host controller [ 22.959142] ohci-pci 0000:00:13.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 5 [ 22.959237] ohci-pci 0000:00:13.0: irq 18, io mem 0xfe5fd000 [ 22.972654] random: nonblocking pool is initialized [ 23.018494] usb usb5: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0001 [ 23.018554] usb usb5: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 23.018605] usb usb5: Product: OHCI PCI host controller [ 23.018650] usb usb5: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ohci_hcd [ 23.018698] usb usb5: SerialNumber: 0000:00:13.0 [ 23.019240] hub 5-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 23.019342] hub 5-0:1.0: 5 ports detected [ 23.019877] ohci-pci 0000:00:16.0: OHCI PCI host controller [ 23.019935] ohci-pci 0000:00:16.0: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 6 [ 23.020023] ohci-pci 0000:00:16.0: irq 18, io mem 0xfe5fc000 [ 23.081765] usb usb6: New USB device found, idVendor=1d6b, idProduct=0001 [ 23.081821] usb usb6: New USB device strings: Mfr=3, Product=2, SerialNumber=1 [ 23.081871] usb usb6: Product: OHCI PCI host controller [ 23.081917] usb usb6: Manufacturer: Linux 3.16.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 ohci_hcd [ 23.081962] usb usb6: SerialNumber: 0000:00:16.0 [ 23.082344] hub 6-0:1.0: USB hub found [ 23.082408] hub 6-0:1.0: 4 ports detected [ 23.785682] usb 4-2: new low-speed USB device number 2 using ohci-pci [ 23.967768] usb 4-2: New USB device found, idVendor=04d9, idProduct=1503 [ 23.967824] usb 4-2: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=0 [ 23.967871] usb 4-2: Product: USB Keyboard [ 23.967915] usb 4-2: Manufacturer: [ 23.973497] hidraw: raw HID events driver (C) Jiri Kosina [ 24.003112] usbcore: registered new interface driver usbhid [ 24.003200] usbhid: USB HID core driver [ 24.006819] input: USB Keyboard as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.0/usb4/4-2/4-2:1.0/0003:04D9:1503.0001/input/input0 [ 24.006968] hid-generic 0003:04D9:1503.0001: input,hidraw0: USB HID v1.10 Keyboard [ USB Keyboard] on usb-0000:00:12.0-2/input0 [ 24.011935] input: USB Keyboard as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:12.0/usb4/4-2/4-2:1.1/0003:04D9:1503.0002/input/input1 [ 24.012130] hid-generic 0003:04D9:1503.0002: input,hidraw1: USB HID v1.10 Device [ USB Keyboard] on usb-0000:00:12.0-2/input1 [ 24.233688] usb 4-5: new full-speed USB device number 3 using ohci-pci [ 24.400767] usb 4-5: New USB device found, idVendor=067b, idProduct=2303 [ 24.400821] usb 4-5: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=0 [ 24.400869] usb 4-5: Product: USB-Serial Controller [ 24.400914] usb 4-5: Manufacturer: Prolific Technology Inc. [ 30.567918] sdh: unknown partition table [ 30.568200] sdj: unknown partition table [ 30.568393] sdi: unknown partition table [ 30.569631] sd 5:4:0:0: [sdi] Attached SCSI disk [ 30.570218] sde: unknown partition table [ 30.570481] sdk: unknown partition table [ 30.571689] sd 5:5:0:0: [sdj] Attached SCSI disk [ 30.571875] sd 5:6:0:0: [sdk] Attached SCSI disk [ 30.572689] sd 5:3:0:0: [sdh] Attached SCSI disk [ 30.572778] sd 5:0:0:0: [sde] Attached SCSI disk
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Jonathan McDowell: Shipping my belongings across the globe

Planet ALUG - Tue, 31/03/2015 - 15:35

I previously wrote about tracking a ship around the world, but never followed up with the practical details involved with shipping my life from the San Francisco Bay Area back to Belfast. So here they are, in the hope they provide a useful data point for anyone considering a similar move.

Firstly, move out. I was in a one bedroom apartment in Fremont, CA. At the time I was leaving the US I didn’t have anywhere for my belongs to go - the hope was I’d be back in the Bay Area, but there was a reasonable chance I was going to end up in Belfast or somewhere in England. So on January 24th 2014 I had my all of my belongings moved out and put into storage, pending some information about where I might be longer term. When I say all of my belongings I mean that; I took 2 suitcases and everything else went into storage. That means all the furniture for probably a 2 bed apartment (I’d moved out of somewhere a bit larger) - the US doesn’t really seem to go in for the concept of a furnished lease the same way as the UK does.

I had deliberately picked a moving company that could handle the move out, the storage and the (potential) shipping. They handed off to a 3rd party for the far end bit, but that was to be expected. Having only one contact to deal with throughout the process really helped.

Fast forward 8 months and on September 21st I contacted my storage company to ask about getting some sort of rough shipping quote and timescales to Belfast. The estimate came back as around a 4-6 week shipping time, which was a lot faster than I was expecting. However it turned out this was the slow option. On October 27th (delay largely due to waiting for confirmation of when I’d definitely have keys on the new place) I gave the go ahead.

Container pickup (I ended up with exclusive use of a 20ft container - not quite full, but not worth part shipment) from the storage location was originally due on November 7th. Various delays at the Port of Oakland meant this didn’t happen until November 17th. It then sat in Oakland until December 2nd. At that point the ETA into Southampton was January 8th. Various other delays, including a week off the coast of LA (yay West Coast Port Backups) meant that the ship finally arrived in Southampton on January 13th. It then had to get to Belfast and clear customs. On January 22nd 2015, 2 days shy of a year since I’d seen them, my belongings and I were reunited.

So, on the face of it, the actual time on the ship was only slightly over 6 weeks, but all of the extra bits meant that the total time from “Ship it” to “I have it” was nearly 3 months. Which to be honest is more like what I was expecting. The lesson: don’t forget to factor in delays at every stage.

The relocation cost in the region of US$8000. It was more than I’d expected, but far cheaper than the cost of buying all my furniture again (plus the fact there were various things I couldn’t easily replace that were in storage). That cost didn’t cover the initial move into storage or the storage fees - it covered taking things out, packing them up for shipment and everything after that. Including delivery to a (UK) 3rd floor apartment at the far end and insurance. It’s important to note that I’d included this detail before shipment - the quote specifically mentioned it, which was useful when the local end tried to levy an additional charge for the 3rd floor aspect. They were fine once I showed them the quote as including that detail.

Getting an entire apartment worth of things I hadn’t seen in so long really did feel a bit like a second Christmas. I’d forgotten a lot of the things I had, and it was lovely to basically get a “home in a container” delivered.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: the russians are back

Planet ALUG - Mon, 30/03/2015 - 09:50

About four years ago I was getting a huge volume of backscatter email to the non-existent address info@baldric.net. After a month or so it started to go quiet and eventually I got hardly any hits on that (or any other) address. A couple of weeks or so ago they came back. My logs for weeks ending 15 March, 22 March and 29 March show 92%, 96% and 94% respectively of all email to my main mail server is failed connection attempts from Russian domains to dear old non-existent “info”. Out of curiosity I decided to capture some of the inbound mails. Most were in Russian, but the odd one or two were in (broken) english. Below is a typical example:

From: “Olga”
To: Subject: Are you still looking for love? Look at my photos!
Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:22:08 +0300
X-Mailer: Microsoft Windows Live Mail 16.4.3528.331

Sunshine!
Are you still looking for love? I will be very pleased to become your half and save you from loneliness. My name is Olga, 25 years old.
For now I live in Russia, but it’s a bad time in my country, and I think about moving to another state.
I need a safer place for life, is your country good for that?
If you are interested and want to get in touch with me, just look at this international dating site.
Hope to see you soon!
Just click here!

Sadly, I believe that many recipients of such emails will indeed, “click here”. Certainly enough to further propagate whatever malware was used to compromise the end system which actually sent the above email.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Mick Morgan: kidnapped by aliens

Planet ALUG - Mon, 30/03/2015 - 09:21

An old friend of mine has expressed some concern at the lack of activity on trivia of late. In his most recent email to me he said:

“You really should revive Baldric you know. Everyone will believe it if you just say you were kidnapped by aliens, and then you can just resume where you left off.”

So Peter, this one is just for you. Oh, and Happy Birthday too.

Mick

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Oddfellows"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 30/03/2015 - 08:31
Event-Date: Wednesday, 1 April, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: http://www.oddfellowshallpub.co.uk Wed 04 Mar 2015/19:30 - 23:00 Compton Wolverhampton West Midlands WV6 8AA Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Hewlett-Packard Platinum Sponsor of DebConf15

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 15:00

We are very pleased to announce that HP has committed support of DebConf15 as Platinum sponsor.

"The hLinux team is pleased to continue HP's long tradition of supporting Debian and DebConf," said Steve Geary, Senior Director at Hewlett-Packard.

Hewlett-Packard is one of the largest computer companies in the world, providing a wide range of products and services, such as servers, PCs, printers, storage products, network equipment, software, cloud computing solutions, etc.

Hewlett-Packard has been a long-term development partner of Debian, and provides hardware for port development, Debian mirrors, and other Debian services (HP hardware donations are listed in the Debian machines page).

With this additional commitment as Platinum Sponsor, HP contributes to make possible our annual conference, and directly supports the progress of Debian and Free Software, helping to strengthen the community who continue to collaborate on their Debian projects throughout the rest of the year.

Thank you very much, Hewlett-Packard, for your support of DebConf15!

Become a sponsor too!

DebConf15 is still accepting sponsors. Interested companies and organizations may contact the DebConf team through sponsors@debconf.org, and visit the DebConf15 website at http://debconf15.debconf.org.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: Making a Portable Persistent Ubuntu USB Stick

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 25/03/2015 - 11:55

I recently wanted to make a slightly modified persistent bootable USB stick running a recent version Ubuntu. I made some notes and have put them here in case they’re useful to anyone else. It’s a bit of a manual process which could probably be streamlined / automated. This was just what I did as a one-off, take from it what you will.

USB3 sticks in a USB3 port work best as USB2 can be a bit on the slow side, especially for IO intensive operations like package installation or compiling.

Note: A few people have pointed out the fragility and short lifespan of USB sticks. This same procedure can be used to install on a hard disk or SSD in a USB enclosure. Once the image is copied to the external storage, simply use gparted to resize it up to take all available space.

The goal I had was to make an image which can be copied to USB stick to provide a persistent bootable Ubuntu SDK development environment. This could be useful for people who don’t run Ubuntu as their primary OS (Yes, these people exist, I know right!?) but want to dabble in Ubuntu application development. It’s also handy if you’re running an App Dev School where the computers aren’t yours, or run some other OS. The students could potentially take the sticks away with the full OS and all their work on. Just make the image and then copy it to multiple sticks before the class starts.

I also wanted to make it ask for locale and user details on first boot, so it could be easily configured and used in any language. This is pretty easy given the Ubuntu installer has all of that built in.

I used Ubuntu 14.10 i386 (but also tried with Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS) and an 8GB USB stick which leaves a couple of GB over for work. Obviously a larger stick gives more space to the user. It turned out though that using an 8GB USB stick was a bit tight for SDK work. I ended up with 76MB left after creating one 15.04 armhf kit. Maybe 8GB is good for desktop and qml/html5 only development (although still a bit tight), but not for cross architecture or other binary builds. 16GB would have enough room for multiple kits and could build binaries for devices.

Some of these steps can be done in the background while you do other things. It’s not a massively time consuming task if you have a decent connection and fast USB stick / hard disk, but as I mentioned, is a bit manual.

The result is a USB stick which you can boot from and work off with data saved to the stick. You can optionally enable home directory encryption during the final end-user setup if that’s important to you.

Step 1 – Prep

Have an 8GB (or larger) USB 3 stick handy. I am using Kingston 8 GB USB 3.0 DataTraveler G4 Flash Drive and later Kingston Technology 16GB Data Traveler G4 USB 3.0 Flash Drive. Faster sticks are available of course, but I wanted something cheap to prototype on.
Have a laptop with a USB 3 port (or ports) and supports kvm. I did all this on my Ubuntu Vivid Vervet (15.04) Thinkpad X220 laptop which has a single USB3 port.
Make a directory on a local disk to store scratch image – will need 16GB or more space
Install qemu-kvm and gddrescue on host
Download ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-i386.iso from http://releases.ubuntu.com/14.10/. (torrent link).

Step 2 – Installation of base system

Make a blank image on local disk
dd if=/dev/zero of=./disk_image bs=1M count=7500
This should result in a file a bit under 8GB.
e.g.

alan@deep-thought:/data/usb⟫ dd if=/dev/zero of=./disk_image bs=1048576 count=7500
7500+0 records in
7500+0 records out
7864320000 bytes (7.9 GB) copied, 34.468 s, 228 MB/s

Install Ubuntu into the image using kvm
sudo kvm -m 2048 -cdrom ~/Downloads/ubuntu-14.10-desktop-i386.iso -hda ./disk_image -boot d
This should boot off the ISO

At the A11Y (person = keyboard) icon, hit space

At the boot menu, choose language (this is just language for the installer, user will later choose which language to use)

Press F3 and choose keyboard layout

Press F4 and choose OEM install

Pick “Install” from the menu.

Follow the installer prompts as normal. I configured with no swap, but use the entire disk for an ext4 volume for the root filesystem.
Set a password for the oem user, which will be thrown away later, and the user will get to set their own password.
Shut-down at the end

Step 3 – Install the SDK

This is the part where you make the modifications to the image (if any). I wanted to install the Ubuntu SDK.

Optionally at this point, make a backup of your cleanly installed Ubuntu 14.10.1 system
cp ./disk_image ./ubuntu_14.10_install_backup

Boot the previously created install (note the additional options – these are handy)
sudo kvm -m 2048 -hda ./disk_image -chardev stdio,id=mon -mon mon
Once booted to the desktop, in the terminal on the host at the (qemu) prompt type this to switch the VM to the console (which is faster to do stuff than the GUI ):-
(qemu) sendkey ctrl-alt-f1
Login to the tty with the oem user/password set in Step 2.
Follow the usual guide to install the SDK and update the system:-
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-sdk-team/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install ubuntu-sdk
sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
sudo apt-get clean
sudo apt-get autoremove

Shut down the vm
sudo shutdown -h now

Optionally at this point, make a backup of your “SDK-installed” (or modified in whatever way you choose) OEM mode Ubuntu 14.10 system
cp ./disk_image ./ubuntu_14.10_install_sdk_oem_backup

Note: At this point you can boot the disk image and do further customisation – maybe adding other packages which may be of use, but I stopped here.

Step 4 – Prepare the OEM image for ‘shipping’

This is the point where we flip the switch in the installed image before handing it off to another user. On first boot they will get prompted to set locale and configure a new user.

Boot the previously created install which has the SDK installed
sudo kvm -m 2048 -hda ./disk_image
Click the “Prepare for shipping to end user” icon on the desktop – this sets the system to be ready for the first-boot experience for a new user
Shut down the system

Step 5 – Test this all worked

Make a copy of the master image for testing
cp ./disk_image ./testing_oem_install
Boot the test image to try it out
sudo kvm -m 2048 -hda ./testing_oem_install
At this point you should be prompted for the usual post-install setup tasks including language / locale / username & password. Setup as you would a normal machine
Open the SDK (or whatever you installed), test it all works
I tried creating a kit and do other SDK related things
Shutdown when done
Delete the test image
rm ./testing_oem_install

Step 6 – Copy the OEM image to a USB stick for shipping / use

Now we have a ‘final’ image (and optionally some backups) we can copy this to a stick for use by us / someone else. We can of course make more than one by doing this step multiple times with different sticks. On my system as you can see it took ~30 mins to copy the image to the stick. Faster, more expensive sticks may be better, these were pretty cheap.

Copy the disk image to an appropriately sized USB stick
sudo ddrescue -d -D --force ./disk_image /dev/sdX

e.g.

alan@deep-thought:/data/usb⟫ time sudo ddrescue -D -d --force disk_image /dev/sdc
GNU ddrescue 1.19
Press Ctrl-C to interrupt
rescued: 7864 MB, errsize: 0 B, current rate: 1966 kB/s
ipos: 7864 MB, errors: 0, average rate: 4884 kB/s
opos: 7864 MB, run time: 26.83 m, successful read: 0 s ago
Finished

real 26m51.682s
user 0m1.212s
sys 0m30.084s

Step 7 – Test & use the stick

Put the USB stick in a computer set to boot from external media.
Test that you get a desktop and the usual OEM prompts you got in Step 5.
If that works then you can do step 5 again for the same stick or as many sticks as you have.

Success!

Comments and suggestions welcome!

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: DebConf15 welcomes new sponsors

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 18/03/2015 - 16:00

The organization of DebConf15 (from 15 to 22 August 2015, in Heidelberg, Germany) is going smoothly, the call for proposals is open and today we want to provide some updates about our sponsors.

Twelve more companies have joined our nine first sponsors in supporting DebConf15. Thank you to all of them!

Our third Gold sponsor is the Matanel Foundation, which encourages social entrepreneurship in all over the world.

IBM, the technology and consulting corporation, has also joined the DebConf15 sponsorship at a Gold level.

Google, the search engine and advertising company, has increased its sponsorship level from Silver to Gold.

Mirantis, 1&1 (which is also one of Debian's service partners), MySQL and Hudson River Trading have committed sponsorship at Silver level.

And last but not least, six more sponsors have agreed to support us at Bronze level: Godiug.net, the University of Zurich, Deduktiva, Docker, DG-i (which is also one of Debian's service partners), and PricewaterhouseCoopers (which also provides consultancy support for DebConf15).

The DebConf15 team is very thankful to all the DebConf sponsors for their support.

Become a sponsor too!

DebConf15 is still accepting sponsors. Interested companies and organizations may contact the DebConf team through sponsors@debconf.org, and visit the DebConf15 website at http://debconf15.debconf.org.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Alan Pope: FOSDEM 2015 Field Report

Planet HantsLUG - Wed, 18/03/2015 - 13:40

A little late, but here’s my report from attending FOSDEM 2015 back at the start of February.

I’ve been to FOSDEM a few times in the past, but not for the last few years. It happened to co-incide with other events, or other family things took priority and then got out of the habit, so I’d not ended up going for 6 years or so!

This year at the last minute I applied for some funds to go, was accepted and made the most of it. I’ve listed below all the talks & sessions I went to, with some brain dump notes I took about some of them. At the bottom I listed some sessions which I didn’t enjoy or get a lot out of, but are listed for completion. I’ve also linked directly to the videos of the talks if they’re available at the time of writing. If not I’ve linked to the directory they should appear in at some point in the future.

A GPS watch made of free software and hardware – Federico Vaga, Matthieu Cattin
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/main_track-hardware/gps_watch__CAM_ONLY.mp4

Recycle your Android devices for anything: run real Linux on them – David Greaves
Talk video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/sailfishos.mp4

  • Room was pretty packed with quite a few Jolla / SailfishOS friendly people at the front – managed to score myself a Jolla beanie hat from them
  • I was interested in this talk because it was focussed mostly on porting Mer & SailfishOS to Android devices.
  • We have a similar porting guide in Ubuntu but ours was outdated and inaccurate. This was fixed recently.
  • The Mer project had a nice overview of ports status online (https://wiki.merproject.org/wiki/Adaptations/libhybris), which I’ve shamelessly stolen for Ubuntu (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1uUHF463g4f4L5ljWZf0l7b4VAevM-twHag4ZoEd_TNc/edit?usp=sharing)
  • Interested in the community they’re building specifically around porting – dedicated irc channel, irc meetings and real world meet-ups are something we should probably consider for our (Ubuntu) porters because right now I think our porters feel a bit helpless at times

Are distributions really boring and a solved problem? – Lucas Nussbaum
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-distributions/distributions_boring_solved_problem.mp4

  • Illuminating talk about some of the problems the Debian project faces currently
  • As I’m not a Debian developer it was interesting to me to learn a bit about the Debian Sausage Factory and some of the issues they/we face

GCompris goes Qt Quick with the help of KDE – Bruno Coudoin
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/gcompris_goes_qt_quick_with_the_help_of_kde__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • A quick talk from Bruno about the work he’s done to port GCompris to the Qt framework
  • Learned that the development model for GCompris includes using In-App-Purchases on non-free platforms (Google Play store) to fund development of Open Source projects.

Copyleft in Europe: How does copyleft interact with Exhaustion Of Rights – Amanda Brock, Andrew Katz
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-legal_and_policy_issues/copyleft_in_europe__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • This was a super fascinating and slightly complex legalese talk which I admit I didn’t completely follow, but Amanda and Andrew made it digestable for a layman such as myself

Fork and Ignore: Fighting a GPL Violation By Coding Instead – Bradley M. Kuhn
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-legal_and_policy_issues/fork_and_ignore__CAM_ONLY.mp4
Slides: http://ebb.org/bkuhn/talks/LinuxCon-North-America-2014/kallithea.html

  • Brilliant talk from Bradley, one of the highlights from FOSDEM. Slides above are from a different event, but same talk as far as I can tell.
  • Was enlightening to see an alternative way to deal with a GPL violation than the default which seems to be to take legal action and sue
  • Not all forks are bad

Ubuntu on phones and beyond – Michał Sawicz
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/ubuntu_on_phones_and_beyond__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Michał gave a brief talk to a pretty packed room about the current state of Ubuntu for devices, and the future direction
  • Turned into more of a Q&A, which was beneficial as much of the audience had questions to ask
  • Was interesting to see some of the same questions come up again and again
  • Depressing to still get “Haha! LOL Amazon shills” comments and questions

Mobile == Web – Stormy Peters
Video: http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/mobile_web__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Call to arms to developers to make their sites work well on the web for the next generation of smart phone users
  • Disappointed to see yet another Mozilla person preach about openness from the confines of a MacBook running OSX

Maintaining & Growing a technical community – Ali Spivak
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-mozilla/ud2218a_maintaining_growing_technical_community__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Ali gave some illuminating stats about contributions to the Mozilla project and how that fluctuates over time
  • Lots of info about what motivates people to contribute to open source projects and Mozilla in particular
  • “Being open is no good if nobody can find your resources” – we (Ubuntu) have some fixes to do there

Internet all the things – using curl in your device – Daniel Stenberg
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/curl_device.mp4

  • This was one of my favourite talks from FOSDEM. Learning how many projects use a simple (hah) tool like curl
  • Even learned about some command line options in curl that I’d not seen or used before.
  • Worth a watch

Living on Mars: A Beginner’s Guide – Ryan MacDonald
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/keynotes/closing_fosdem__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • Fantastic talk to round off FOSDEM 2015. Ryan gave a fast-paced & entertaining talk about the Mars One mission plan and his part in it.

Porting Tizen:Common to open source hardware devices – Phil Coval
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/open_hw_tizen.mp4

  • Another porting talk (to go along with the Jolla one above) specifically talking about porting Tizen to Open Hardware
  • Interesting to hear about the Sunxi community build up around porting

Reached milestones and ongoing development on Replicant – Paul Kocialkowski
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-embedded/replicant_embedded_freedom.mp4

  • Fascinating talk detailing what lengths Paul goes to in order to develop a fully Free Software implementation of Android
  • In short, it’s not ‘finished’, and with the limited number of devices it’s possible to ‘open up’ probably won’t be any time soon

GNOME – creating ripples in the Linux eco-system – Sri Ramkrishna
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-desktops/gnome_creating_ripples_in_the_linux_ecosystem__CAM_ONLY.mp4

  • I was somewhat disappointed in this talk as it seemed to be billed as showcasing the best of what GNOME have done over the years, but came across as poorly thought through and the points a bit laboured.

Servo (the parallel web browser) and YOU! – Josh Matthews
Video:- http://video.fosdem.org/2015/devroom-mozilla/ud2218a_servo_and_you.mp4

  • Josh did a great job of showing the state of Servo right now and where gaps exist in the functionality, certainly worth watching for the Servo demo alone
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: Debian is now welcoming applicants for Outreachy and GSoC Summer 2015

Planet HantsLUG - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 21:45

We'd like to reshare a post from Nicolas Dandrimont.

Hi all,

I am delighted to announce that Debian will be participating in the next round of Outreachy and GSoC, and that we are currently welcoming applications!

Outreachy helps people from groups underrepresented in free and open source software get involved. The current round of internships is open to women (cis and trans), trans men, genderqueer people, and all participants of the Ascend Project regardless of gender.

Google Summer of Code is a global program, sponsored by Google, that offers post-secondary student developers ages 18 and older stipends to write code for various open source software projects.

Interns for both programs are granted a $5500 stipend (in three installments) allowing them to dedicate their summer to working full-time on Debian.

Our amazing team of mentors has listed their project ideas on the Debian wiki, and we are now welcoming applicants for both programs.

If you want to apply for an internship with Debian this summer, please fill out the template for either Outreachy or GSoC. If you’re eligible to both programs, we’ll encourage you to apply to both (using the same application), as Debian only has funds for a single Outreachy intern this round.

Don’t wait up! The application period for Outreachy ends March 24th, and the GSoC application period ends March 27th. We really want applicants to start contributing to their project before making our selection, so that mentors can get a feel of how working with their intern will be like for three months. The small task is a requirement for Outreachy, and we’re strongly encouraging GSoC applicants to abide by that rule too. To contribute in the best conditions, you shouldn’t wait for the last minute to apply :-)

I hope we’ll work with a lot of great interns this summer. If you think you’re up for the challenge, it’s time to apply! If you have any doubts, or any question, drop us a line on the soc-coordination mailing list or come by on our IRC channel (#debian-soc on irc.debian.org) and we’ll do our best to guide you.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Meeting at "The Oddfellows"

Wolverhampton LUG News - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 15:20
Event-Date: Wednesday, 18 March, 2015 - 19:30 to 23:00Body: http://www.oddfellowshallpub.co.uk Wed 04 Mar 2015/19:30 - 23:00 Compton Wolverhampton West Midlands WV6 8AA Eat, Drink and talk Linux
Categories: LUG Community Blogs

Debian Bits: apt install dpl-candidate: Mehdi Dogguy

Planet HantsLUG - Sat, 14/03/2015 - 20:36

0. Who are you and what is your history with Debian Project?

I guess this part is well covered in my platform.

1. What is your most proud moment as Debian Developer?

I am pretty proud of having been part of the few who implemented the first automatic dependency resolver for OCaml programs and libraries in Debian packages. It was really the first one in the OCaml community and we were quite proud of it. But that was done before I become a Debian Developer.

As a DD, I have to admit I am quite proud to be part of the Release Team. It is a fantastic team where there is so much to do. Helping the team means something to me, and I invested a considerable amount of time (a few months) working on reviewing patches for Squeeze and helping to get it ready by our standards. My best moment was Squeeze's release, my first Debian release as Release Team member.

2. In your opinion what is the strongest part of Debian Project?

I am not sure we can identify one single strength of the Debian project. But, when I think about your question, I remember something I've heard many times: “Debian is about people”. I have to admit that I didn't realize it myself until I heard it for the first time and I completely share the idea! For me, all the technical side of the project comes after the community. With time, I think we managed to build a strong community. Many contributors became friends with time. We are seeing many Developers having babies and bringing them to Debian events. I find that really amazing.

3. And what is the weakest part of Debian Project?

Our strength is somehow also our weakness. We are humans and make mistakes. We have feelings and some discussions get heated sometimes. It is not easy to keep everyone calm and focused. We have seen the damage that was caused to our core community last year with all the flamewars. Many people lost their motivation and we have seen some of them stepping down. We are also having troubles on-boarding new contributors, which is a problem today because some teams are under-staffed and could become an even bigger issue on the longer term.

4. How do you intend to resolve the weakest part?

An effort has already been made on this front. We can mention the introduction of the Code of Conduct and the diversity statement, for example. Both are important and make us a more welcoming and caring community.

In my platform, I mentioned some ideas about recruitment and change management. I believe that both sides will help us to get a stronger community. Moreover, a DPL should act as a mediator to help some situation get through. This is one of the DPL tasks that is not formally identified and is usually under-estimated.

5. DPL term lasts for one year - what would you challenge during that term and what have you learned from previous DPL's?

Personally, the main thing I have learned from past DPLs is that communication is very important. A DPL should dedicate time to communicate about ongoing actions and achievements. It is also important to remind a few things even if it may sound repetitive or trivial:

  • Why such action/subject is important.
  • What actions have been tried/done in the past.
  • What progress has been made since last time.
  • What is possibly the next step.

If the communication is only about listing some actions, many people will miss its essence and its goals. It is even more important when we know that some actions may take years (thus, several DPL terms) to complete.

If I am elected as DPL, I'd really like to help the project to publish a roadmap. I think it is very important to set goals to the project to better explain our philosophy and approach in the Free Software world. This may also help to attract new contributors which may be interested by one or some items. Of course, I will not work on that subject only. I invite you to read the rest of my platform to see the other ideas.

6. What motivates you to work in Debian and run for DPL?

Many many things. And more importantly, many many people

As many of us, I like programming and socializing. It feels nice to be part of such a big project and where you can do many different things. I contribute to Debian because I find it fun and let me meet people I will not have been able to meet elsewhere.

In my platform, I tried to identify ideas I'd like to see implemented, or at least started. Since Debian is a do-ocracy, I thought I could try to get them implemented by myself. I think that those ideas are important for the Debian community and will help us moving forward. Running for DPL is also another way of contributing to Debian and I'd feel honored to represent Debian.

Categories: LUG Community Blogs
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